She Lost Her Foot To Cancer, But What She Did With It Will Make You Laugh.

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Rather than be angry at her situation, Loyall tries to see the humour by posting photos of her foot wherever she goes.

Doctors who perform amputations on their patients are not usually asked for that part back. Kristi Loyall, is not your typical patient though. In 2011, the young woman began to feel numbness in her right pinky toe. She discussed this with a doctor who didn't think it was anything to worry about. Over the years, the numbness worked its way to half of her foot. At night, she was facing extreme pain in her foot but she assumed she was just having sleep problems. Finally, her doctor referred her to a neurologist but after six visits they couldn't give her a concrete diagnosis. By 2015, a lump had grown. She was sent for an MRI and x-rays. Doctors believed she had lipoma, a non-cancerous fatty tumor or Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome, constriction/compression of the nerves in the foot. Finally, the hard news came in April 2016, it was cancer. After a failed surgery that did not remove the cancer completely, thus, causing to spread to the rest of the foot her only option was amputation.
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"I asked, 'Can I have my foot back?'" Loyall tells ABC News. "He thought I was kidding, but then he's like, 'I think that you can, but not too many people ask for body parts back.'"

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The cancer did not extend beyond her right foot. She admits, early detection is vital. "If you have any lumps or abnormalities, I'd tell people to get it checked out. I might not have lost my foot had I moved a little faster," she says.

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Loyall's cancer is an aggressive epitheliod sarcoma. She is being monitored by the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas.

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Having a good sense of humour and good friends she says are key to her recovery.

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"At first, I thought my life was over. but after I got my foot back, I've been more positive," Loyall says. "I was pessimistic, but this changed my attitude about life."

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Part of the healing process meant she takes her foot everywhere she goes.

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"One of my main coping mechanisms is to make a joke of everything. I made the Instagram, and I like to take pictures of the foot," she says.

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Her Instagram account is appropriately named @onefootwander.

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She says people have been very supportive, writing positive comments on her account.

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When out in public with her foot, strangers assume it's plastic. "Someone said, 'I like your foot,' as I was taking a picture once. My roommate was holding it once as we went to get food, and the guy at the drive-thru though it was cool," she says.

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Loyall has been out of work for almost a year and her medical bills continue to mount, adding to those expenses are her rent, food, and other expenses.

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Another concern she has is her German Shepherd Nova wanting a taste of her foot. "I usually keep the foot in my car so my dog doesn't get it. I usually just keep it in the trunk, in a shoe box," she says with a laugh.

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If you want to help Kristi Loyall with her recovery costs, you can donate on the [GoFundMe][1] page set up her behalf. [1]: https://www.gofundme.com/2tsr2mpu